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Ichabod Crane

Ichabod B. Crane, was born on July 18, 1787, in Elizabethtown, New Jersey (now Elizabeth, NJ).  He is the second son of Army Brigadier General William H. Crane and brother to Commodore William M. Crane.
Ichabod was a career military officer for 48 years, first joining the United States Marine Corps in 1809, at the age of 22, he was commissioned a second lieutenant, assigned to the USS United States, a 44-gun frigate commanded by Commodore Stephen Decatur.  Crane served aboard the United States for two years and then resigned from the Marines in April 1812, to accept a commission in the United States Army as a captain in command of Company B, 3rd Artillery; the unit designation would later be Battery B, 1st Artillery (today’s 2nd Battalion, 1st Air Defense Artillery).

During the War of 1812, Crane served on the Niagara Frontier.  He was assigned command of an artillery battery at Fort Pike, which he helped construct, in Sackets Harbor, New York, and was involved with the capture on April 27, 1813, of Fort York, and at the end of May 1813 the capture of Fort George in Canada.  While capturing Fort George, a joint British-Canadian force attacked the American positions at Sackets Harbor in the Second Battle of Sacket’s Harbor.

Crane continued to serve in the Northern Department after the war.  In 1820 his company was transferred to Fort Wolcott in Newport, Rhode Island where Crane served as the fort’s commander.

In 1825 he was brevetted to major in the 4th Artillery and was transferred to Fort Monroe, Virginia.  In 1832 Crane led five companies of troops in the Black Hawk War and received a promotion to lieutenant colonel in the 2nd Artillery in November 1832, and was then transferred to the Buffalo Barracks in Buffalo, New York.  Crane commanded the 2nd Artillery unit in the Second Seminole War (1835–1842) and acted as Commander of the U.S. Army District of Northeast Florida.  Fort Crane, built in January 1837, south of Rochelle, Florida, in Alachua County, was named after Crane.  After service in Florida, he and his unit were transferred back to the Buffalo Barracks.

During the “Patriot War” in 1838, an insurrection against British rule in Canada, Crane was tasked with preventing U.S. involvement of smuggling arms across the border.

In mid-1843 he received his final promotion to colonel and was given command of the 1st Artillery.  Company L and Company M, of the 1st Artillery,  were assigned to Fort Umpqua in southwest Oregon.  During a visit there Crane employed a young Umpqua Indian named Juan as a personal valet.  Juan died on December 27, 1856, in Staten Island, and is buried with Crane and his wife.

Crane was stationed in Washington D.C. in 1851 and was given an additional assignment as acting governor of the Military Asylum at Washington, D.C., a position he held until November 1853.  He also served a post commander of Governors Island, an island in New York Harbor approximately one-half mile south of lower Manhattan.

Crane and his wife Charlotte (May 25, 1798 – September 25, 1878) had a house built in the New Springville, a section of Staten Island, New York in 1853, while he was still on active duty.  Crane died four years later, in October 1857 at the age of 70; he was still on active duty.  He is buried in Asbury Methodist Cemetery, in New Springville Staten Island.

His grave marker bears the inscription: “He served his country for 48 years and was much beloved and respected by all who knew him.”

It’s believed that the character featured in Washington Irving‘s short story, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow“, was named after Colonel Crane.  Irving met Crane in 1814 at Fort Pike located on Lake Ontario in Sackets Harbor, New York.  Irving was an aide-de-camp to New York Gov. Daniel D. Tompkins, who was inspecting defenses in the Sackets Harbor area.  Crane’s unusual and memorable first name Ichabod comes from the biblical name of the grandson of Eli the High Priest and son of Phinehas.
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Chesty Puller

Lewis Burwell “Chesty” Puller was born on June 26, 1898 in West Point, Virginia.  His father was a grocer who died when Chesty was 10 years old.  He grew up listening to old veterans’ tales of the Civil War and idolizing Stonewall Jackson.  He wanted to enlist in the Army to fight in the Border War with Mexico in 1916, but he was too young and his mother wouldn’t give parental consent.

The following year, Chesty attended the Virginia Military Institute but left in August 1918 as World War I was still ongoing.  He was inspired by the 5th Marines at Belleau Wood He enlisted in the Marine Corps as a private and attended boot camp at the MCRD, Parris Island.

He never saw action in World War I, but the Marine Corps was expanding, and after graduating from recruit training he attended non-commissioned officer school and Officer Candidates School (OCS) at Quantico, Virginia.  He graduated from OCS on June 16, 1919 and was appointed a second lieutenant in the reserves.  With the end of WWI, the Corps experienced a quick reduction in force from 73,000 Marines to 28,500 Marines (only 1,100 officers and 27,400 enlisted).  Chesty was put on inactive status and given the rank of corporal.

Soon after, Corporal Puller received orders to serve in Haiti.  While the United States was working under a treaty with Haiti, he participated in over forty engagements during the next five years against the Caco rebels and attempted to regain his commission as an officer twice.  During his time in Haiti, in 1922, he served as an adjutant to Major Alexander Vandegrift.

On March 6, 1924, he returned stateside and was finally recommissioned as a second lieutenant.  He was then assigned at Marine Barracks in Norfolk, Virginia, The Basic School in Quantico, Virginia, and with the 10th Marine Artillery Regiment in Quantico, Virginia, Marine Barracks in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in July 1926 and in San Diego, California, in 1928.

In December 1928, Puller was assigned to the Nicaraguan National Guard detachment, where he was awarded his first Navy Cross for actions from February 16 to August 19, 1930, when he led “five successive engagements against superior numbers of armed bandit forces.”  He returned stateside in July 1931 and completed the year-long Company Officers Course at Fort Benning, Georgia.  He then returned to Nicaragua from September 20 to October 1, 1932, and was awarded a second Navy Cross.  Chesty led American Marines and Nicaraguan National Guardsmen into battle against Sandinista rebels in the Sandino Rebellion near El Sauce on December 26, 1932.

After his service in Nicaragua, Chesty was assigned to the Marine detachment at the American Legation in Beijing, China, commanding a unit of China Marines.  He then went on to serve aboard USS Augusta, which was commanded by Captain Chester W. Nimitz. Chesty returned to the States in June 1936 and was assigned to instructor duty at The Basic School in Philadelphia.

In May 1939, he returned to the USS Augusta, as the commander of troops for the Marine detachment.  They headed back to China in May of 1940 and he served as the executive officer and commanding officer of 2nd Battalion, 4th Marines, until August 1941.  Major Puller returned to the U.S. on August 28, 1941.  After a short leave period, he was given command of 1st Battalion, 7th Marines (1/7) of the 1st Marine Division, stationed at New River, North Carolina.

Early in the Pacific theater the 7th Marines formed the nucleus of the newly created 3rd Marine Brigade and arrived to defend Samoa on May 8, 1942.  Later they were redeployed from the brigade and on September 4, 1942, they left Samoa and rejoined the 1st Marine Division at Guadalcanal on September 18, 1942.

Soon after arriving on Guadalcanal, Chesty led his battalion in a fierce action along the Matanikau, in which his quick thinking saved three of his companies from annihilation.  The three companies were surrounded and cut off by a larger Japanese force.  Chesty ran to the shore, signaled the USS Ballard (DD-267)and then directed the Ballard to provide fire support while landing craft rescued his Marines.  U.S. Coast Guard Signalman First Class Douglas Albert Munro was the Officer-in-Charge of the group of landing craft and was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions.  To date Munro is the only Coast Guardsman to receive the decoration. Chesty was awarded the Bronze Star with Combat “V”.

Later on Guadalcanal, Chesty was awarded his third Navy Cross, in what was later known as the “Battle for Henderson Field“.  He commanded 1st Battalion 7th Marines (1/7), one of two American infantry units defending the airfield against a regiment sized Japanese force.  The 3rd Battalion of the U.S. Army’s 164th Infantry Regiment (3/164) fought alongside the Marines.  In a firefight on the night of October 24–25, 1942, lasting about three hours, 1/7 and 3/164 sustained 70 casualties; the Japanese force suffered over 1,400 killed in action, and the Americans held the airfield. He nominated two of his men (one being Sgt. John Basilone) for Medals of Honor.  He was wounded himself on November 9, 1942.

Chesty was then assigned to be the executive officer of the 7th Marine Regiment.  While serving in this capacity at Cape Gloucester, he was awarded his fourth Navy Cross for overall performance of duty between December 26, 1943, and January 19, 1944.  During this time, when the battalion commanders of 3rd Battalion, 7th Marines (3/7) and later, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines (3/5), were under heavy machine gun and mortar fire, he reorganized the battalion and led the successful attack against heavily fortified Japanese defensive positions.  He was promoted to Colonel effective February 1, 1944, and by the end of the month had been named commander of the 1st Marine Regiment.  In September and October 1944, Puller led the 1st Marine Regiment into the Battle of Peleliu, one of the bloodiest battles in Marine Corps history; it was here that he received his first of two Legion of Merit awards.  The 1st Marines under his command lost 1,749 out of approximately 3,000 men, but these losses did not stop him from ordering frontal assaults against the well-entrenched enemy.  The Commandant of the Marine Corps, (General Alexander Vandegrift) had to order the Commanding General (Major General William H. Rupertus) of 1st Marine Division to pull the 1st Marine Regiment out of the battle.

Chesty returned to the United States in November 1944 and was assigned as the executive officer of the Infantry Training Regiment at Camp Lejeune and two weeks later he became the Commanding Officer.  After the war, he was made director of the 8th Reserve District at New Orleans, and later commanded the Marine Barracks at Pearl Harbor.

At the outbreak of the Korean War, Chesty was again assigned as commander of the First Marine Regiment.  He participated in the landing at Inchon on September 15, 1950, and was awarded the Silver Star Medal and was awarded his second Legion of Merit for his leadership from September 15 through November 2.  He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross from the U.S. Army for heroism in action from November 29 to December 4, and he was awarded his fifth Navy Cross for heroism during December 5–10, 1950, at the Battle of Chosin Reservoir.  It was during that battle that he said the famous line, “We’ve been looking for the enemy for some time now. We’ve finally found him. We’re surrounded. That simplifies things.”

In January 1951, Chesty was promoted to brigadier general and assigned as the assistant division commander of 1st Marine Division.  On May 20, 1951, he became the commanding officer of the 3rd Marine Division at Camp Pendleton, California until January 1952, and was then assistant commander until June 1952.  He then took over Troop Training Unit Pacific at Coronado, California and in September of 1953, he was promoted to major general.

In July 1954, Chesty took command of the 2nd Marine Division at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina until February 1955 when he became deputy camp commander.  He suffered a stroke, and with 37 years of service he was retired from the Marine Corps on November 1, 1955 with a tombstone promotion to lieutenant general.

Chesty is the most decorated Marine in American history.  He is one of two U.S. servicemen to be awarded five Navy Crosses and with the Distinguished Service Cross awarded to him by the U.S. Army, his total of six stands only behind Eddie Rickenbacker‘s eight times receiving the nation’s second-highest military award for valor.

Chesty passed away on October 11, 1971 at the age of 73, in Hampton, Virginia.  He was an Episcopalian and parishioner of Christ Church Parish and is buried in the historic cemetery next to his wife Virginia Montague Evans, who passed away in 2006, at the age of 97.

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Drew Carey

Drew Carey was born on May 23, 1958, and grew up in the Old Brooklyn neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio.  He graduated from James Ford Rhodes High School in 1975 and then  attended Kent State University.  He left Kent State after three years and enlisted into the Marine Corps Reserves in 1979 and served for four years with Headquarters and Services Company, 3rd Battalion, 25th Marines, as a field radio operator.

In 1985, Drew began his comedy career by following up on a suggestion by David Lawrence, a disc jockey friend who had been paying Drew to write jokes for David’s radio show in Cleveland.  The following year, Drew won an open-mic contest and became Master of Ceremonies at the Cleveland Comedy Club.  He performed at comedy clubs over the next few years in Cleveland and Los Angeles.

Drew first came into the national spotlight when he competed in the 1988 series of Star Search.  He then appeared on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson in November 1991.  His performance impressed Johnny, who invited Drew to sit on the couch next to his desk; this was considered a rare honor for any comedian.  In that same year, Drew joined the 14th Annual Young Comedians Special on HBO and made his first appearance on Late Night with David Letterman.  In 1994, Carey wrote his own stand-up comedy special, Drew Carey: Human Cartoon, which aired on Showtime and won a CableACE Award for Best Writing

Drew has appeared in several films, television series, music videos, a made-for-television film, and a computer game.  He has hosted The Price Is Right since 2007 on CBS.  He is interested in a variety of sports, and has worked as a photographer at U.S. National Team soccer games, and is a minority owner of the Major League Soccer team Seattle Sounders FC.  Drew has written an autobiography, Dirty Jokes and Beer: Stories of the Unrefined, detailing his early life and television career.

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Harvey Keitel

Harvey Keitel was born on May 13, 1939 in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Miriam and Harry Keitel, Jewish immigrants from Romania and Poland, respectively.  His parents owned and ran a luncheonette and his father also worked as a hat maker.

Harvey grew up in the Brighton Beach section of Brooklyn, with his sister and brother.  He attended Abraham Lincoln High School and Alexander Hamilton Vocational School, but dropped out to join the Marines in 1956.  While serving with 2nd Marine Division as a rifleman fire team leader, his service took him to Lebanon, during Operation Blue Bat.

Harvey’s time in the Marines made a huge influence on his life and helped shape many of his perspectives.  During training at night combat school, he mentioned being afraid of the dark.  An instructor told him that everyone is afraid of the dark because people are afraid of the unknown, and he would teach him how to handle it. Harvey took the lesson to heart and extended it to other areas of his life over the years.

After his discharge he returned to New York and worked as a court stenographer for several years and was able to support himself before beginning his acting career when he joined the New York’s Actors Studio.  His persistence paid off, and he began landing roles in live theater.

His film career took off with Martin Scorsese‘s 1967 “Who’s That Knocking at My Door.”  The actor and director hit it off, and Harvey returned in future Scorsese films.

Harvey’s film career now has 150 credits as an actor, and five as a producer, spanning from 1966 – present day, he is still active in Hollywood and working on several projects, with his latest films including “Chosen“, “The Ridiculous 6“, and “The Comedian.”  He credits time serving the Marine Corps for his success and professionalism within the film industry.

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Donald Bren

Donald Bren was born on May 11, 1932, in Los Angeles, California.  His father Milton was a naval officer, talent agent, real estate developer, and successful movie producer.

Donald attended the University of Washington, on a skiing scholarship and earned a degree in business administration and economics.  After graduation he and then served for three years as an officer in the Marine Corps.

He began his business career at the age of 25, in 1958 when he founded the Bren Company, which built homes in Orange County, California.  He built his first house in Newport Beach with a $10,000 loan.

In 1963, he and two others started the Mission Viejo Company (MVC) and purchased 11,000 acres to plan and develop the city of Mission Viejo, California.  Donald was President of MVC from 1963 to 1967.  International Paper bought Bren Co. for $34 million in 1970, and then sold it back to Donald for $22 million in 1972 following the recession.  He took the proceeds and in 1977 joined a group of investors to purchase the 146-year-old Irvine Company,

The historic Irvine Company dates back to 1864, and has been the master planner and master builder of the 93,000 acre Irvine Ranch since 1960.  This purchase made him the largest shareholder of the company, owning 34.3% and gave him the title of Vice-chair of the board.  By 1983, he was the majority owner of the firm and was elected chairman of the board.  By 1996, he bought out all outstanding shares to become the sole owner.

In 2005, OC Weekly wrote that Bren “wields more power than Howard Hughes ever did, probably as much as any man in America over a concentrated region—determining not only how people live and shop but who governs them.”  In 2006 the Los Angeles Times said that Orange County looks like Orange County because of Donald Bren.  In its 2015 edition of, “The 400 Richest Americans“, Forbes ranked Donald as the wealthiest real estate developer in the US and 30th “Richest American” with an estimated net worth of $15.2 billion. Today, he is number 29 on the Forbes 400 list.

The Irvine Company now owns several hotels, marinas, golf courses, 60,000 apartments, more than 40 shopping centres and 500 office buildings make up the property portfolio, with the majority located in Southern California. .

In 2008, BusinessWeek named Bren one of the top ten philanthropists in the nation, with his contributions to various causes such as education, conservation and research among other areas exceeding $1 billion.

You can read more about Donald by visiting: The Irvine Company and by visiting the SuccessfulMarines PX for products related to Donald’s successful career.

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Bea Arthur

Beatrice Arthur, originally Bernice Frankel was born on May 13, 1922, in Brooklyn, New York.  In 1933, the Frankel family relocated to Cambridge, Maryland, where her parents operated a clothing shop.  She attended Linden Hall School for Girls, the oldest girls’ boarding school in the United States.  She then enrolled at Blackstone College for Girls in Blackstone, Virginia, where she was active in the drama program.

Her employment after attending Blackstone College for Girls, included working as a food analyst at a Maryland packing plant; a hospital lab technician, and an office worker at a New York loan company.  She was due to start another job when she heard that the Marine Corps had opened enlistments to women.   She decided to join, with hopes of going into ground aviation. She went to basic training in March 1943, at the age of 21.

During her service she worked as a typist and a truck driver and had assignments at Marine headquarters in Washington, D.C., a Navy air station in Virginia and Marine Corps Air Station in Cherry Point, North Carolina.  A year into her enlistment, she married a fellow Marine, Private Robert Aurthur, in a ceremony presided over by a city judge in Ithaca, New York.  She then formally had her named changed to Bernice Aurthur.  She completed her two years of service, achieving the rank of staff sergeant before being honorably discharged in September 1945.

After her discharge she changed her name to Bea Arthur, as she started her career in acting.  In 1947 she studied at the Dramatic Workshop of The New School in New York with German director Erwin Piscator.  Bea began her acting career as a member at the Cherry Lane Theatre in New York City.

She continued with acting roles on and off Broadway throughout the 1950s and 1960s.  She was then invited by Norman Lear to guest-star on his sitcom All in the Family, as Maude Findlay, an outspoken liberal feminist.  Her performance eventually led to her own series as the character and earned her several Emmy and Golden Globe nominations, including an Emmy win in 1977, for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series.

Her acting career included other less known television shows and movies until she landed a role in 1985 for The Golden Girls, the series remained on the top-ten with ratings, for six out of the seven seasons.  Baa’s performance led to several Emmy nominations over the course of the series and an Emmy win in 1988.

In 1992, she decided to leave The Golden Girls.  She made several guest appearances on shows and toured in her one-woman show, titled An Evening with Bea Arthur, as well as And Then There’s Bea.

Bea died from cancer, at her home in the Sullivan Canyon section of Brentwood, California on April 25, 2009.   She is survived by her two sons and two granddaughters.

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Rob Riggle

 

Robert Allen “Rob” Riggle, Jr. (born April 21, 1970) is an American actor, comedian and retired U.S. Marine officer.  He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, but his family moved to Overland Park, Kansas when he was two years old.  He attended Shawnee Mission South High School, where he was involved in the school’s radio and TV stations.  He was voted the most humorous and graduated in 1988. Riggle later graduated from the University of Kansas, in 1992, with a B.A. in Theater and Film, while attending the university he also made time to get his pilot’s license, and became a member of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity.  He went on to earn a Master of Public Administration degree from Webster University in 1997.

He joined the Marines on April 25, 1990, after getting his pilot’s license, intending to become a Naval Aviator, he was able to get a guaranteed flight contract.  When he was in flight school he was faced with making a difficult decision.  He could continue flying and earn his flight wings, but if he did that he wouldn’t have time to pursue his comedy career.  So he decided to pursue his comedy and acting career.

He then had his flight contract changed to a ground contract and became a Public Affairs Officer.  He served for nine years on active duty before going into the reserves.  As a Public Affairs Officer, he was usually attached to command elements and he served with a number of different units including: 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marines; 3rd Battalion, 8th Marines; 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable); 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing; U.S. Central Command and 5th Special Forces Group.  While serving, he visited Liberia, Kosovo, Albania, and Afghanistan.  His military education includes The Basic School, Aviation Indoctrination, Primary Flight Training, Intermediate Flight Training, Defense Information School, The Warfighting Course, Amphibious Warfare School and Command & Staff College.

His military decorations include:  Meritorious Service Medal (2); Navy and Marine Corps Commendation MedalJoint Service Achievement MedalNavy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (2); Combat Action RibbonNational Defense Service Medal (2); Kosovo Campaign MedalAfghanistan Campaign MedalGlobal War on Terrorism Service MedalHumanitarian Service MedalArmed Forces Reserve Medal; and NATO Medal.

Many celebrity vets leave the service behind once they make it in Hollywood, but Rob was still a Marine and he managed to put in the required time for the Corps. while his career in Hollywood was gaining traction.  On January 1, 2013, Rob retired from the Marine Corps Reserves, as a Lieutenant Colonel, after 23 years of service.

 He is best known for his work as a correspondent on Comedy Central’s The Daily Show from 2006 to 2008, as a cast member on Saturday Night Live from 2004 to 2005, and for his comedic roles in films such as The Hangover, The Other Guys, Let’s Be Cops, 21 Jump Street, 22 Jump Street, The Goods: Live Hard, Sell Hard, and Step Brothers.
He now has over 100 acting credits, 9 writing credits, 2 producer and director credits.  See more on his IMDB profile.  You can also follow him on Facebook and Twitter.
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Hugh O’Brian

Hugh O’Brian, born on April 19, 1925 in Rochester, New York.  His original name is Hugh Charles Krampe, he changed it to O’Brien (from his mother’s side), because it was prone to less misspelling.  But they misspelled that, too, as “O’Brian,” so he just decided to stay with that.

He attended school at New Trier High School in Winnetka, Illinois, and Kemper Military School in Boonville, Missouri, playing football, basketball, wrestling, and track.  After graduation he spent a semester at the University of Cincinnati, studying law.  He then enlisted in the Marine Corps during World War II, at the age of 17 and became the youngest Marine Corps drill instructor in American history.  O’Brian served as a tank crewman, during his four-year service, he won a coveted Fleet appointment to the Naval Academy.  After passing the entrance exams, he declined the appointment, to enroll at Yale University, to study law.  He was honorably discharged at the rank of  Corporal.

Hugh went to Los Angeles, where he planned to earn money for his Yale tuition.  He met Ruth Roman and Linda Christian, who introduced him to a little theater group and was asked to fill in when a leading actor became ill.

Hugh became one of the forefathers of the modern Western,  best known for portraying Sheriff Wyatt Earp in TV’s “The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp”.  He had a successful acting career that lasted into the early 2000s, with 112 credits including appearances on Charlie’s AngelsL.A. Law, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, and The Love Boat.  He shared the screen with legends such as Kirk Douglas, Rock Hudson, Spencer Tracy, Patricia Neal, Marilyn Monroe and Arnold Schwarzenegger.

He is now most remembered for creating a non-profit organization, known as Hugh O’Brian Youth Leadership (HOBY), to help high school sophomores develop leadership abilities.  O’Brian founded HOBY in 1958, after being inspired by the work of the Nobel Prize-winning Albert Schweitzer, since then more than 470,000 people have attended the program.

Hugh died at his home in Beverly Hills, on September 5, 2016, at the age of 91 from a variety of unspecified health issues.

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Bradford Dillman

Bradford Dillman was born on April 14, 1930 in San Francisco, California, the son of Josephine (née Moore) and Dean Dillman, a stockbroker.  He attended the Hotchkiss School in Connecticut, where he became involved in school theatre productions.  He attended Yale University, studying theatre and drama.  While at Yale, he enlisted in the Navy Reserves in 1948.  He graduated from Yale with a BA in English Literature.

After graduating from Yale, he entered the Marine Corps as an officer candidate, training at Parris Island.  He was commissioned as a second lieutenant in September 1951.  As he was preparing to deploy to Korea, his orders were changed, and he spent the rest of his time teaching communications in the Instructors’ Orientation Course.  He was discharged in 1953 as a first lieutenant.

Returning to Connecticut, he studied with the Actors Studio, and spent several seasons apprenticing with the Sharon Connecticut Playhouse before making his professional acting debut in The Scarecrow in 1953.  Dillman took his initial Broadway bow in the Eugene O’Neill play Long Day’s Journey Into Night in 1956, playing the author’s alter ego character Edmund Tyrone and winning a Theatre World Award in the process.  This distinct success put him squarely on the map and 20th Century Fox took notice by placing him under contract.

Dillman has 140 credits towards his acting career with television movies such as Fear No Evil (1969), Moon of the Wolf (1972), and Deliver Us from Evil (1973)  and tv series, The Love Boat, Murder She Wrote, and Dynasty.

You can check out his entire acting career on IMDB.

Dillman also released a football fan book, Inside the New York Giants, in 1995 and an autobiography, Are You Anybody?: An Actor’s Life, in 1997.

Dillman currently lives in Montecito, California and helps raise money for medical research.

 

 

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Don Adams

Donald James Yarmy, professionally known as Don Adams, was an American actor, comedian, and director.   Born on, April 13, 1923, in Manhattan, New York.  He dropped out of DeWitt Clinton High School and worked as a theater usher.

During World War II, he joined the Marine Corps and participated in the Battle of Guadalcanal, when his service ended from being shot in combat and contracting blackwater fever, a serious complication of malaria.  He was evacuated and hospitalized for more than a year at a Navy hospital in Wellington, New Zealand.  After his recovery, he served as a drill instructor.

After his service, he began a career as a stand-up comic, taking the stage name of Adams after marrying singer Adelaide (Dell) Efantis, who performed as Adelaide Adams. They had four daughters, and Adams also worked as a commercial artist and restaurant cashier to help support his family.  When they divorced, he kept Adams as his stage name because acting auditions were often held in alphabetical order.

His television career began when he won the Ted Mack & the Original Amateur Hour (1948) talent contest.  His most famous role, being secret agent Maxwell Smart (Agent 86) in the classic sitcom/spy spoof Get Smart (1965), which he also sometimes directed and wrote.  In the late 1950s, he made eleven appearances on The Steve Allen Show where Dana was part of the writing team. During the 1961-63 television seasons, he was a regular on NBC’s The Perry Como Show as part of The Kraft Music Hall Players.  He had a role on the NBC sitcom The Bill Dana Show (1963–65) as a bumbling hotel detective named Byron Glick.  Adams won three consecutive Emmys for his portrayal of Smart (1967–69).  He also provided the voices for the animated series Tennessee Tuxedo and His Tales (1963–66) and Inspector Gadget (1983–85, as well as several revivals and spinoffs in the 1990s).

Adams died on September 25, 2005, at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California.  He suffered from lymphoma and a lung infection.

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